What Could Go Wrong – Ep 13

Summary

Have you ever sat down in class only to realize you forgot there’s a test that day? Or decided to show off your water skiing skills (despite never being on them) and fallen flat on your face? What Could Go Wrong is a meme for a reason – everyone’s been caught off guard trying to fake it until they make it. In this episode, we have two stories about diving into a situation only to realize they are in way over their heads.

First is Heather Armitage, a library and hilarious storyteller who launches this teen drama about disobeying parents off with a bang. Her story was recorded live at 3S Artspace in Portsmouth, NH as part of the September 2019 show, Breaking All the Rules. 

Next is Tristan Law, a LSS Advisory Board member and talent booker in New Hampshire. Before he was booking national acts at some of oldest and most popular music venues in the state, he was a bartender – which is fodder for many stories right there. If you’ve ever had a nightmare about entering a room completely unprepared, this story is for you.

If you like our show, please subscribe, rate and review! You can also find us @longstoryshort3s on Instagram.

Storytelling in Portsmouth

To learn more about Long Story Short, how to become a storyteller, and sign up for email alerts about upcoming live shows, go to https://longstoryshortpod.com/

— This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/beth-lamontagne-hall/support

In this week’s episode

Want to get a sneak peek of the episode? Read more or get the whole story by listening above.

I don’t know about you, but I’m one of those people who just can’t seem to get out of my own way. I dive into stuff without prep all the time, like the show and this podcast. And while I’ve been able to manage this personality, quirk with some skill, I love hearing about how other people deal with the realization that they are in way over their heads.

This episode, we’ve got two stories about people who dove in headfirst only to realize they were in no way prepared for what they were getting into. The first is from long story short advisory board member, Ian talent, Booker for local music venues here in Portsmouth, Tristin law. This story is so self-deprecating and sneaky.

Hilarious. I know you’re going to love it. Before we get to that story though. I want to send a huge shout out to the storytellers who were at the last long story, short show. They were great as always, we’ll be putting them out here soon on the podcast, but also wanted to let you know that if you want to join the live show, you can get in touch with me@longstoryshortpod.com.

Just by clicking the button at the top of the page and filling out the form, we can get you all the details you need to learn about getting on upcoming shows. The next of which is crushed stories of young love coming on September 8th. All right, first though, we have a story from Heather Armitage. She’s a wonderful kind and hilarious librarian who much like me was a bit awkward in my teen years and a not so good judge of situations that might be precarious.

Great Performances – Ep. 10

Summary

Beth shares two stories from Rob Richards and Catherine Stewart, two performers with extensive theater backgrounds. The episode highlights excellent writing and execution that transcend the genre and elevate the art of storytelling.

Long Story Short is a storytelling series for people of all levels and is often a place for beginners to showcase their stories and build their performance chops. However, there are highly experienced storytellers and performers who take the stage at 3S Artspace to share their work. Here are two of those stories.

To connect to Long Story Short and learn more about our upcoming live shows, go to https://www.longstoryshortpod.com/

Portsmouth Storytelling Opportunities

To learn more about Long Story Short and sign up for email alerts about upcoming live shows, go to https://longstoryshortpod.com/

For tickets to the June 9 live show at 3S Artspace in Portsmouth, NH, got to https://www.3sarts.org/ — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/beth-lamontagne-hall/support

Transcription

Another Minisode! – June 2021

Summary

There are some great events coming up in June, including another Long Story Short live show. But that’s not all. There are storytelling events around New England and beyond that celebrate diverse voices and explore identity in honor of both Pride Month and Juneteenth. Give a listen and if you’re looking for more info, check out the links we’ve included here.

Long Story Short live show at 3S Artspace – SOLD OUT! – But virtual tickets still available at https://www.3sarts.org/

The Moth Virtual Story Slam: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/eastern-virtual-storyslam-rhythm-registration-146794266603?_ga=2.149402166.1098958053.1621987323-1685510138.1620154924

Flatwater Tales Storytelling Festival: https://flatwatertales.com/

Black History Trail Juneteenth 2021: https://www.facebook.com/events/black-heritage-trail-of-new-hampshire/juneteenth-2021-art-of-the-story-exploring-how-dna-powers-a-changing-narrative/495019428514881/

Life’s a Drag: https://www.3sarts.org/

— Want to offer financial support to this podcast? Here’s how: https://anchor.fm/beth-lamontagne-hall/support

Transcription

At Your Service – Ep. 12

Summary

The live stories are back! We’ve got two stories about the ins and outs of serving others. Whether it’s the service industry or the health care industry or elder care, it takes a special temperament to provide great service. 

The episode features Dagan Migirditch, co-owner of Liar Bench Brewing Company, based in Portsmouth, NH and Larry Clow, a writer, editor and frequent trivia champion. Both are exceptional writers whose talent shines through in their storytelling style and comedic timing.

Dagan’s story is from the 2015 show “The Waiting Game” and Larry’s story is from the 2016 show “Past Lives.”

Portsmouth Storytelling Opportunities

To learn more about Long Story Short and sign up for email alerts about upcoming live shows, go to https://longstoryshortpod.com/

For tickets to the June 9 live show at 3S Artspace in Portsmouth, NH, got to https://www.3sarts.org/ — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/beth-lamontagne-hall/support

In this episode

Get a sneak peek of this week’s episode here!

It’s a certain personality to be in the service industry. You have to be able to quickly identify what people want and. Be willing to provide it. If he can’t, you have to have the right kind of diplomacy skills to not only cushion the blow, but if you’re really good at it and make the customer feel like, well, maybe I didn’t really want it that bad anyway.

For this episode, we’ve got two stories about serving others, whether it’s waiting tables or caring for people who no longer can do it themselves. When I decided to pair these two stories together, I don’t know, about six months ago, I thought we were going to be eating outside forever. If you’ve been missing the hustle and bustle of being out and eating out and sitting at a bar and being elbow to elbow with somebody that you love this episode is for you.

We have writer Larry Clough, who appeared on the March, 2016 show past lives. He’s a writer and a former journalist friend of mine , who has a really great sense of humor. And we also have co-owner of liars bench brewing company in Portsmith. Dagon meager ditch who performed at one of the first ever long story.

Short shows way back in 2015. He’s also got a really cool. Kyle and way of constructing his stories. I think you’re really gonna, like both these stories have stuck in my memory as being among my favorites. Cause they’re hilarious. And like I said, there’s a cool structure and the way that they set them up and just in general, they’re, they’re the product of killer writing it wasn’t until recently I realized how similar these two stories from two different shows actually were.

Stories With Puppets: Interview With Pat Spalding – Ep. 11

Summary

Beth talks with storyteller, performer and former puppeteer Pat Spalding, one of the people behind the storytelling series True Tales Live. They discuss Pat’s early days of telling stories through puppets, monologue-style storytelling, and how Covid has her writing all new material. This episode is chock full of wisdom about crafting and rehearsing stories for the stage. It’s a must listen for anyone who wants to get into storytelling, or would like to up their performance game.

To watch Pat Spalding’s show, We Stayed Together for the Puppets, go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=igpfaYAibw4&authuser=1

Live Shows at 3SArtspace

To connect to Long Story Short and learn more about our upcoming live shows, go to https://www.longstoryshortpod.com/

Portsmouth Storytelling Opportunities

To learn more about Long Story Short and sign up for email alerts about upcoming live shows, go to https://longstoryshortpod.com/

For tickets to the June 9 live show at 3S Artspace in Portsmouth, NH, got to https://www.3sarts.org/ — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/beth-lamontagne-hall/support

In this episode

Get a sneak peek at the episode below or check out the full audio episode above. This interview includes storytelling advice, as well as tips on how to write and perform before various audiences.

I’ve always made things and when I was in high school, I was more a visual artists. I constructed things. When I went into college, I graduated with an art degree. Yeah, I think I did.

And I liked tactile materials. I liked fabric and all that sort of thing. So, before graduating, a friend and I made puppets just for the hell of it, just as objects, interesting objects. And she put them in an exhibit which, some woman came. This is, we’re talking now in the seventies, mid seventies, early to mid seventies. And, this woman wanted a puppet show for a birthday party and Nancy who’s my friend, she said, “Well, uh, we don’t have one.”

And the woman says, “Well, it’s not for three months. And could you come up with one?”

And she said, “Maybe.” So she got in touch with me. We pulled the puppets. We messed around with voices and characters. We just played like two kids would play with dolls. We played with these odd, this odd combination of puppets.

We adapted some fairytales then we did this show three months later. And it went over pretty well. I mean, it was fun. The kids enjoyed it. It was funny. So without intentioning to do so we had a puppet show. Word got around to different libraries.

People started asking us, so we kept doing shows and we were in business, you know, unintentionally in business. And that business grew. And I became a puppeteer. So I was in investing time and adapting stories, creating stories. We did some, the show got bigger that we did it for about three years, so that partnership fell apart.

But I got to puppetry performance through the visual construction of puppets. And the use of puppets and reuse of puppets rather than making an object to sell. I made an object to rent. People paid me for the use of this object. So, crazily, I got into puppetry for economic reasons.

Great Performances – Ep. 10

Summary

Beth shares two stories from Rob Richards and Catherine Stewart, two performers with extensive theater backgrounds. The episode highlights excellent writing and execution that transcend the genre and elevate the art of storytelling.

Long Story Short is a storytelling series for people of all levels and is often a place for beginners to showcase their stories and build their performance chops. However, there are highly experienced storytellers and performers who take the stage at 3S Artspace to share their work. Here are two of those stories.

To connect to Long Story Short and learn more about our upcoming live shows, go to https://www.longstoryshortpod.com/

You can also learn here where to sign up to tell a story and find resources for honing your storytelling craft.

In this episode

Get an introduction to this episode below or check out the full audio above.

We’ve got some fantastic, really unique stories coming in this episode that really stand above and beyond in style and in performance. Some of the other stories that we have had over the years and I really wanted to take some time to highlight them because the people who brought these stories are extremely skilled in what they do and deserve their own episode and their own recognition.

One of the defining elements of Long Story Short has been the casual nature of the stories people tell. I use the term off the cuff a lot. Now, this is something people have used kind of as a slag against the show. Like as if, because these stories are a little less rehearsed, they aren’t true storytelling.

Not that there’s anything wrong with that polished and perfectly timed story that you’re going to hear on like a moth story slam, slam, nothing wrong with that. It’s just typically not a bar I require for everyone who appears at this show and I think that’s to the show’s benefit. I would say that at least 50% of the people who get up to tell a story have never performed in this style before at all.

And I try to foster the super casual storytelling style because I think that it allows for an entry for people who aren’t performers, but have something really important to say. And I think that it allows for the audience to feel a little bit more comfortable sometimes and makes the event feel a little bit more like a conversation.

However, once in a while, I am lucky enough to get approached by people who have both performance skills and writing skills that are exemplary and the storytelling skills to make them what I would consider, , a, true performer. In this episode, I have two stories from people who are actively working within the theater profession.

It’s a Minisode! – April 2021

Summary

Want to know about storytelling events are happening in April? Beth’s got a brief Northern New England round up in this inaugural minisode. The focus is our neck of the woods, Northern New England, but in the months ahead we plan to highlight more virtual events and in-person shows outside our region too.

If you have an event you’d like mentioned in May, go to https://www.longstoryshortpod.com/ contact page to send Beth the info.

What Makes a Story? w/ Stephanie Lazenby – Ep. 9

Summary

Beth talks to Stephanie Lazenby who wrote, co-directed and starred in the one-woman show, “Where Do I Begin?” about her experiences growing up in the Bronx in the 70s and 80s. It is a nostalgic, music-infused show that explores her relationship with her dad, as well as how music and objects throughout our lives impact memory.

The show was performed at the West End Theatre in Portsmouth, NH in January 2021 as part of the New Hampshire Theatre Project’s SoloStage Series.

In this two-part interview, Beth and Stephanie talk about the struggles of being creative during the pandemic, overcoming the inner voices that infuse self-doubt, and take on the question, “What makes a good story?” These interviews were recorded in February 2021.

Live Shows at 3S Artspace

To connect to Long Story Short and learn more about our upcoming live shows, go to https://www.longstoryshortpod.com/

Portsmouth Storytelling Opportunities

To learn more about Long Story Short and how you can become a storyteller on an upcoming show, go to https://longstoryshortpod.com/

For tickets to the June 9 live show at 3S Artspace in Portsmouth, NH, got to https://www.3sarts.org/ — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/beth-lamontagne-hall/support

In this episode

Check out the intro to this conversation with Stephanie, or listen to the full interview above.

This is a really great episode so I want to get into it as quickly as possible, but for it to make sense you have to get a little bit of backstory. Today we’ve got Stephanie Lazenby, an actress, comedian, storyteller, writer, and just really an all- all around great person to talk to. I asked her to do an interview earlier this year after seeing her one woman show, “Where Do I Begin?” at the West End Theater.

It was really sweet and funny and nostalgic about her life growing up in the Bronx and her relationship with her father. I was just blown away with the writing and the way that the staging was all put together and obviously her performance. So I wanted to talk to her a bit about how this play came together and how it was so closely connected to the live storytelling that I love and we try to do here at Long Story Short. The conversation went great and I was ready to dive in to putting it together and then I get an email from Stephanie that sent me right back to the drawing board in terms of how I was going to frame this episode. So let’s get to my discussion with Stephanie as it started.

And, uh, I want to let you know, at some point, I’m going to jump back in to explain what happened and how we completely reshaped the end, end of this interview. Okay. Here we go. Here’s Stephanie Lazenby.

Fathers and Daughters – Episode 8

Summary

Family relationships are complicated. It’s why so many people bring stories about parents, siblings, children and in-laws to the Long Story Short stage. In this episode, Beth has two stories about the dad-daughter dynamic.

This Episode Features:

Storytellers include Charleen Thorburn telling a touching story that had the audience reaching for the tissues at the March 11, 2020 show, Denial; and Nel Dennett with a hilarious story from the September, 19, 2018 show, What I Thought I Knew.

Portsmouth Storytelling Opportunities

To learn more about Long Story Short and sign up for email alerts about upcoming live shows, go to https://longstoryshortpod.com/

For tickets to upcoming live shows at 3S Artspace in Portsmouth, NH, go to https://www.3sarts.org/ — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/beth-lamontagne-hall/support

In this episode

Read a bit of the transcript or check out the full episode and stories above.

This week, we’re going to talk about fathers and daughters. Personally speaking, I’ve been lucky to have a great relationship with my dad. He’s not just a good guy and a good father, but he’s given me a lot of great advice over the years. He instilled confidence when I hadn’t, I had zero confidence in myself.

And he gave me an invaluable gift that has brought me here today: an appreciation for a well-told story. But I know not everyone has had the same kind of relationship with their dad. For some, it’s a relationship of fearful respect. For others, it’s mistrust. Or their relationship might be tinge by loss because for a lot of people I know at this point in my life, their dad is no longer with us.

For this episode, I have two stories from daughters talking about their fathers for better or worse. This first one is from Charlene Thorburn. She is a physician assistant whose stories are some of the series’ most memorable. Charlene is vibrant and funny and so honest. Uh, I just don’t see how you’re not going to love her and her story.

The Business of Storytelling – Episode 7

Summary

What makes a story resonate? How can you get a message to break through? On this episode, Beth talks to marketing pro Mike Teixeira, co-founder of Crackle PR and founder of DECK presentations. They talk about story structure, developing plot and the hero’s journey, as well as what storytelling for business really means and what companies need to do to make it work.

Beth also discussed the themes for the 2021 Long Story Short live shows at 3S Artspace. The first show, It’s All Relative, will be on Wednesday, April 14. This live streamed show will include some audience involvement, a hallmark of the Long Story Short live shows for the past five years. 

Portsmouth Live Storytelling Information

How do you get involved in a show? How do you get tickets? Here’s all you need to know.

For tickets to upcoming live shows, go to https://www.3sarts.org/

To learn more about Long Story Short and how to become a storyteller on future shows, go to https://longstoryshortpod.com/

For tickets to upcoming live shows at 3S Artspace in Portsmouth, NH, go to https://www.3sarts.org/ — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/beth-lamontagne-hall/support

In this episode

Mike Teixeira provides lots of good advice in this episode on storytelling including reference to Joseph Campbell’s “The Power of Myth.” Check out part of his interview below or get the entire interview above.

When I decided to do these interviews on the show, one of the first people that came to mind was my guest for today, Mike Teixeira. A few years ago, , the two of us hosted a storytelling workshop together and Mike was really great. He took a portion of the presentation and talked a lot about story structure and arc, building tension that got the listener or the reader from point A to point Z.

And I also really wanted to talk to Mike because of his experience in storytelling for business. Mike built his career in marketing and as the co-founder of Crackle PR and the founder of DEC Presentations. Storytelling has become such a buzz word in marketing and business right now that I think it’s lost a bit of its meaning.

And for so many of the people who normally listen to the show or have gone to the live shows, hearing about storytelling in business is not why you came here. So allow me to take a moment and convince you to stick around.

You keep mentioning the hero’s journey? If I, uh, done my homework correctly, that’s a Joseph Campbell and, ,

One of my favorite books in college was “The Power of Myth” where he spoke to Bill Moyers and it was a cool interview book and it was one of those books that just blows your mind when you’re in college and ideas are exciting and fresh.

And I remember them discussing how there’s universal themes to stories that just keep getting reused and reused since we sat around the fires in the front of caves. And one of those themes that are universal is the hero’s journey. The idea that. , a person starts pretty normal lives. All of a sudden everything changes.

They go through adversity and they end up, , you know, transformed I here. And, and it’s, it’s something that I’ve kept in mind a lot through marketing. And Aaron’s trying to tell stories in different format. But I got really excited when I found out that one of the writers that Pixar, , the gentleman by the name of Ken Adams, I think he’s a, he’s an improv, , artists and a writer.

He wanted to kind of dissect the hero’s journey in a, , in a formula friendly kind of way. So he created a very cool structure that they call them Pixar prongs. And that got me excited because I think one of the biggest hurdles. When your average person has to do a presentation or a public speaking event is we want to denigrate ourselves.

We want to say, Oh, I’m not a hero. You know, nothing I do. Is that exciting? What are people going to want to come and listen to me for? What, what kind of things can I tell them? , that are going to excite them. And so if you start talking to them about a hero’s journey, I think that creates even a bigger verbal.

So when I found this Pixar formula, I was like, wow, this is great because it’s so attainable. It’s just the series of blanks and it’s, like a fill in the blank and it’s just, it’s so common down to earth.